Rite of passage

Brought to you by: But the age at which this happens, and how a child celebrates their rite of passage into adolescence, depends entirely on where they live and what culture they grow up in. Looking back, we'll never forget the majesty that was prom, or the excitement of hitting the dance floor at our friends' co-ed Bar and Bat Mitzvah parties, and why should we? Jewish Coming of Age Tradition:

Rite of passage

If the blemishes Rite of passage in this or a previous life are not… Nature and significance Many of the most important and common rites of passage are connected with the biological crises, or milestones, of life—birth, maturity, reproduction, and death—that bring changes in social status and, therefore, in the social relations of the people concerned.

Other rites of passage celebrate changes that are wholly cultural, such as initiation into societies composed of people with special interests—for example, fraternities. Rites of passage are universal, and presumptive evidence from archaeology in the form of burial finds strongly suggests that they go back to very early times.

One aspect of rites of passage that is often overlooked by interpreters perhaps because it appears obvious is the role of the rites in providing entertainment. Passage rites and other religious events have in the past been the primary socially approved means of participating in pleasurable activities, and religion has been a primary vehicle for artmusicsongdance, and other forms of aesthetic experience.

The worldwide distribution of these rites long ago attracted the attention of scholars, but the first substantial interpretation of them as a class of phenomena was presented in by the French anthropologist and folklorist Arnold van Gennepwho coined the phrase rites of passage. Van Gennep saw such rites as means by which individuals Rite of passage eased, without social disruption, through the difficulties of transition from one social role to another.

On the basis of an extensive survey of preliterate and literate societies, van Gennep held that rites of passage consist of three distinguishable, consecutive elements: The person or persons on whom the rites centre is first symbolically severed from his old status, then undergoes adjustment to the new status during the period of transition, and is finally reincorporated into society in his new social status.

Rite of passage - New World Encyclopedia

Although the most commonly observed rites relate to crises in the life cycle, van Gennep saw the significance of the ceremonies as being social or cultural, celebrating important events that are primarily sociocultural or human-made rather than biological.

Classification of rites No scheme of classification of passage rites has met with general acceptance, although many names have been given to distinguishable types of rites and to elements of rites. The name purification ceremonies, for example, refers to an element of ritual that is very common in rites of passage and also in other kinds of religious events.

In most instances, the manifest goal of purification is to prepare the individual for communication with the supernatural, but purification in rites of passage may also be seen to have the symbolic significance of erasing an old status in preparation for a new one see also purification rite.

Other names that have been given to passage rites often overlap.

The Rite of Passage extends to The Reader an often poignant, always moving fleeting view into one man's contemplation as he considers the profusion that life has to offer. The Rite of Passage I won this race with Rite Of Passage . Rite of passage definition, a ceremony performed to facilitate or mark a person's change of status upon any of several highly important occasions, as at the onset of . Rite of Passage is dedicated to improving the lives of youth. Help our students become tomorrow’s leaders by joining our team of professionals or donating to Passageway Scholarship Foundation. Learn more about Rite of Passage by receiving our latest news or by contacting us.

Life-cycle ceremonies and crisis rites are usually synonymous terms referring to rites connected with the biological crises of life, but some modern scholars have included among crisis rites the ritual observances aimed at curing serious illnesses.

Ceremonies of social transformation and of religious transformation overlap and, similarly, overlap crisis rites. Religious transformations, such as baptism and rites of ordinationalways involve social transformations; social transformations such as at coming-of-age and induction into office may also bring new religious statuses, and life-cycle ceremonies similarly may or may not involve changes in religious statuses.

It is nevertheless sometimes useful to distinguish the various rites by these names. Life-cycle ceremonies Life-cycle ceremonies are found in all societies, although their relative importance varies. These rites involve the parents as well as the child and in some societies include the couvadewhich in its so-called classic form centres ritual attention at childbirth upon the father rather than the mother.

At this time the father follows elaborate rules of ritual procedure that may include taking to bed, simulating labour pains, and symbolically enacting the successful birth of a child.

In all societies some ritual observances surround childbirth, marriage, and death, though the degree of elaboration of the rites varies greatly even among societies of comparable levels of cultural development. Rites at coming-of-age are the most variable in time in the life span and may be present or absent.

In some societies such rites are observed for only one sex, are elaborate for one sex and simple for the other, or are not observed for either sex.

Rite of passage

Characteristically, rites at coming-of-age are not generally observed in modern industrial and postindustrial societies. For example, the Jewish bar mitzvah and bat mitzvah and Protestant confirmation are, in their current forms, more or less vestiges of formerly important religious rites.

Similarly, in East Asia, performances of rites at coming-of-age have waned in recent times. The elaborate rites observed a century ago in Japan, for example, when young men and young women reached social maturity are only rarely observed today and are virtually unknown to the general population.

Death is given social attention in all societies, and the observances are generally religious in intent and import. In societies that fear dead bodies, the deceased may be abandoned, but they are nevertheless the focus of ritual attention. Most commonly, rites at death are elaborate, and they include clearly all of the stages of separation, transition, and reincorporation first noted by van Gennep.

Ceremonies of social transformation Ceremonies of social transformation include all the life-cycle ceremonies, since these involve social transitions for the subjects of the ritual and also for other persons.

A man or woman who dies, for example, assumes a new social role as a spirit that may be socially important to the living, the bereaved spouse becomes a widow or widower, and the children have an unnamed but changed status as lacking one parent.

Nature and significance

A vast number of rites of social transformation, such as rites of initiation into common-interest societies, have no direct or primary connection with biological changes, however. These are abundant in the United States and in Europe, usually as secular ceremonies. Whether hereditary or achieved by appointment or election, assumption of important office in various kinds of societies is often observed by elaborate ritual.

Any other events involving changes in social status tend to become the subjects of institutionalized ritual, which is then a prerequisite for the new status. Common examples are initiation ceremonies of college fraternities, sororities, and honorary societies; adult fraternal societies; and social groups of other kinds centred on common interests.

Other social changes of importance that apply to a substantial number of people but do not involve initiation into organized social groups are also given ritual attention.

Common among these are graduation exercises, festivities marking retirement from work, and various kinds of award ceremonies.A rite of passage is a ceremony and marks the transition from one phase of life to another.

Although it is often used to describe the tumultuous transition from adolescence to adulthood, it does refer to any of life’s transitions (Births and Beginnings, Initiations, Partnerings, and Endings or Death).

A rite of passage is a ceremony of the passage which occurs when an individual leaves one group to enter another. It involves a significant change of status in society.

Rite of passage

In cultural anthropology the term is the Anglicisation of rite de passage. The Rite of Passage extends to The Reader an often poignant, always moving fleeting view into one man's contemplation as he considers the profusion that life has to offer. The Rite of Passage I won this race with Rite Of Passage .

Rite of Passage is dedicated to improving the lives of youth. Help our students become tomorrow’s leaders by joining our team of professionals or donating to Passageway Scholarship Foundation.

Rite of passage

Learn more about Rite of Passage by receiving our latest news or by contacting us. Rite of passage definition, a ceremony performed to facilitate or mark a person's change of status upon any of several highly important occasions, as at the onset of .

Rite of passage, ceremonial event, existing in all historically known societies, that marks the passage from one social or religious status to another.

Rite of passage - Wikipedia