Directing malvolio in act 2 scene

Come thy ways, come along with me; see note on i.

Directing malvolio in act 2 scene

Cesario admits that it was he, and Malvolio holds out a ring to him — seemingly a ring that Duke Orsino sent to Olivia, one which Cesario left behind by mistake. Malvolio adds sarcastically that Cesario would have saved Malvolio the time and trouble of returning it if Cesario had not been so absent-minded.

Scornfully, Malvolio tells Cesario to return to his master, Orsino, and tell him that Olivia "will none of him," and furthermore he warns Cesario that he should "never be so hardy to come again in his [Orsino's] affairs. Left alone, Viola ponders all that has happened; she is absolutely certain that she left no ring with Olivia, yet why does Olivia believe that she did and, moreover, why did she send Malvolio with such urgency to return it?

Then she realizes what may have happened, and she is horrified: Olivia has indeed fallen in love with Cesario; when she spoke to the young man, she spoke in starts and spurts, and her manner was vague and distracted.

Twelfth Night

Now "the winning of her passion" has sent Malvolio after the "boy" whom she believes to be the object of her love. Viola pities Olivia; it would be better for the poor Olivia to "love a dream. She knows the anguish of love: Viola loves her master, Orsino, who loves the beautiful but disdainful Olivia, who loves the handsome Cesario who is not a man at all, but is Viola, in disguise.

Viola calls on Time to untangle this knot, for she is incapable of doing so herself; "it is too hard a knot for me to untie. In this short scene, Malvolio is seen returning the ring in a very scornful, haughty, and arrogant manner. The scene serves in part to bring out Malvolio's rudeness and his ill nature.

He is extremely insolent to a youth who has caused him no personal injury. His unwarranted enmity is seen in the manner in which he delivers the ring. Malvolio's action here again prepares the reader for delight in the tricks that will later be played on this insolent man who shows nothing but scorn for any person who is not above him in social status.

While this scene does not advance the plot, it does show us how intricately Viola is caught up in the entanglement. She suddenly realizes that Olivia has fallen in love with an exterior facade — and not with the inner person.

This realization allows her to comment on the "frailty" of women who are constantly deceived by disguises of one sort or another. Yet, Viola must retain her disguise because, as a girl alone in a foreign country, she would be powerless to defend herself, as we see later when the cowardly Sir Aguecheek threatens her.Explanatory Notes for Act 2, Scene 5 From Twelfth Night Or What You Will.

Ed. Kenneth Deighton. London: Macmillan. 1. Malvolio? suppose it should turn out that I am intended, that this letter is for me. brock, badger, a term of contempt from the rank smell of the animal.

Directing malvolio in act 2 scene

This detailed scheme aimed at KS3 Students focuses on exploring Shakespeare's 'Twelfth Night'. What are the outcomes of the scheme?

-Students will approach the play more interactively through dramatic activities, reading, directing a 5/5(1). Malvolio's mock-grandiose manner becomes clear in this scene; Maria accurately notes that Malvolio "cons state without book," meaning that he uses high-flown language without necessarily knowing its proper meaning (heartoftexashop.com).

Oct 11,  · Fordham University Directing Program Presents William Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night: Or What You Will" Directed by Rebecca Etzine Featuring: . LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Twelfth Night, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

Weigel, Moira. "Twelfth Night Act 2, scene 5." LitCharts. LitCharts LLC, 22 Jul Web. 21 Nov Weigel, Moira.

Act 2 Scene 5 of Twelfth Night Essay Example For Students | Artscolumbia

"Twelfth Night Act 2, scene 5." LitCharts. LitCharts. LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Twelfth Night, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Weigel, Moira. "Twelfth Night Act 2, scene 2." LitCharts. LitCharts LLC, 22 Jul Web.

18 Nov Weigel, Moira. "Twelfth Night Act 2, scene 2." LitCharts. LitCharts.

Twelfth Night - Maria leaves a love letter for Malvolio to find